Repair the base shelves at a Do-It-All outdoor bar

Repair the base shelves at a Do-It-All outdoor bar

After reassembling the decks of their suburbs of Des Moines, Iowa, Jessica and Kirk Eno were almost ready for the holidays. The missing ingredient: a place to set up snacks and drinks. A $ 60 outdoor metal shelf unit that Jessica, the artistic director of BH&G Do It Yourself magazine, was spying on in a discount home store was a thin profile. “I decided to move the top as a shelf, put a bar top on it to look more like furniture, and add some kind of cooler,” Jessica says. Two hours of tinkering and approx. It was $ 40 sets, and it had a bar — with a cedar top that matches the planks the couple mounted on a vinyl siding.

How to make a DIY outdoor bar

Jessica turned the top of the slat into a shelf and installed it to leave a few inches of space under the 6-inch-deep pool, which she painted black.

Step 1: Select the base

Because it used a ready-to-assemble shelf unit, replacing the top was easy. Lattice shelves prevent water from collecting. Jessica’s unit (no longer available) is 40 ′ ′ wide, 30 ′ ′ high and about 14 ′ ′ deep.

 

Step 2: Add the pool

Jessica used a stainless steel steam table pan (used for buffets) as a pop-up drink tub. Find them online or at restaurant stores.

Step 3: Install the counter

Jessica cut a 1 × 8 cedar sheet into two pieces the width of her unit. He drilled holes in the bottom of one of the planks along one of the long edges with a pocket drill and drill, then screwed the two boards together. Pocket-hole carpentry work provides a smooth, strong surface without screws. To cut it, he marked the dimensions of the pool (under the lip) on top of the tree and unloaded it with a jigsaw puzzle.

Step 4: Apply Wood Sealer

To protect the wood, Jessica used a clean waterproofing sealant. The base has a powder-coated surface designed for outdoor use. If yours isn’t an indoor piece, spray it with a clean protective agent that resists rust and decay, such as Rust-Oleum Stops Rust Clear Enamel ($ 4, The Home Depot).

Step 5: Assemble the unit

The original top and shelf of Jessica’s piece twisted the legs, so she drilled a new row of holes at a depth of 10 inches, mounted the top as a shelf, and then secured the new top using L-brackets and original holes. He twisted a cup hook into the wood like a towel rack and tossed the drink tub into the cutout. The lip rests on top of the tree and covers the raw edge of the hole.

Step 6: Protect the outdoor bar

To prolong the life and appearance of her bar, Jessica stores it in the garage out of season. Still, he says the peak is a bit weathered. To restore the wood, scrub off dirt and old surfaces with a soft bristle brush, then brush with a clean sealant.

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